Support for Researchers

face

Katrine Sundsbo

Scholarly Communications and Research Support Manager


ksunds@essex.ac.uk

3153


Research Support at the University of Essex is facilitated by collaboration between different sections like the Library Services, the Research and Enterprise Office and the UK Data Archive. This page will give you an overview of the research support that is covered.


Research Support at the Library

Publishing

Publishing

Get advice on things like how to find a good journal to publish in and how to avoid pitfalls of publishing.

Create and Measure Impact

Create and Measure Impact

How to measure and amplify the impact of your research.

Online Research Profiles

Online Research Profiles

Managing your online identity as a researcher has never been more important, get advice here!

Early Career Researchers

Early Career Researchers

PhD students and researchers in their early careers will have a lot to learn and navigate. We’ve made it a bit easier for you.

Research support beyond the library:


Open Access

Open Access

Publish Open Access to increase your visibility and make your work compliant with funder policies and the REF (Research Excellence framework)

Repository

Repository

Find publications and theses from University of Essex academics and students.

Research Information System (RIS)

Research Information System (RIS)

Get an overview of your publications, grants and impact. You can also deposit your work to the repository via the Research Information System (login required).

Finding research funding

Finding research funding

Get an overview of the main founders to help you identify a suitable funder.

Funding Application

Funding Application

Get tips and assistance with your funding application from the Research and Enterprise Office.

Data Management

Data Management

Many funders now require that a data management and sharing plan is submitted as a part of a research grant application.

Publishing

One of the most important things highlighted by successful researchers is choosing the right journal to publish in.


Top tip: To increase your chances of getting accepted by a publisher you should choose a publisher first, and then write your manuscript according to the guidelines on the publisher’s website.


How do I find the right journal to publish in?


LAPTOP
  1. 1. Look at your references

  2. Think of publishing as joining a conversation. If you want to contribute to the conversation it makes sense to publish where the conversation is taking place –hence looking at your references.

  3. 2. Think about your audience

  4. Thinking about who will be reading your article is key. If your research is in a niche topic, you should choose a niche journal. If it is on a more general topic, it is best to choose a journal with a wider scope.

  5. 3. Use tools to identify journals

  6. Scopus Sources is a great tool to find a journal. You can search for a title or browse potential journals via the subject area filter. Try searching for a few keywords and if you want to compare journals you can do so via the compare sources section. Here you can look at the journal metrics and the % of documents not cited in each of the journals.

  7. 4. Ask your colleagues (or supervisor)

  8. Some of your colleagues will have a lot of experience with publishing and will therefore know much about the various journals in the field.

  9. 5. Ask an expert

  10. Your subject librarian or the Scholarly Communications and Research Support Manager will be able to help you find a good journal to publish in using several tools, resources and years of experience!


Please note that you should only submit your manuscript to one journal at a time.


For more detailed help on publishing please contact the Scholarly Communications and Research Support Manager (ksunds@essex.ac.uk)


Things to beware:

Predatory Journals/publishers

These are often referred to as ‘Fake journals’ and take advantage of the system created by Open Access journals – where the author pays to publish (in most cases these fees are paid by the funder). A predatory journal usually skips the peer review process so that they can publish as much and as fast as possible in order to gain more money. In other words, articles in these journals will be of low quality and could potentially be misleading for others if they contain errors.


If you are unsure if a journal is safe or not, always check their website to make sure they have:

  • An editorial board (with real members!)
  • A real address
  • Correct spelling and grammar throughout the website
  • Information about their fees and peer review process

You can also use the Think. Check. Submit. resource or the DOAJ as a guide to find a safe Open Access journal.

Read more about predatory journals here:


Citation Cartels & citation stacking

Citation cartels and citation stacking are examples of ways editors, researchers and journals are trying to increase their academic impact (citations) by gaming the system.


Citation stacking is when academics cite themselves to get more citations or when a journal asks academics who submit their manuscripts to add references that are from the same journal to increase the citations to the journal. However, this is now very easy to discover, and so citation cartels have emerged.


Citation cartels are groups of people or journals (usually editors in the journals) who agree to cite each other in order to boost the impact of the journal. Journals usually do this during the peer-review process by suggesting that academics add a lot of references to their manuscripts that are from two or three other journals – these journals will then return the favour.

If someone asks you to cite irrelevant research in your work please do get in touch for advice. (ksunds@essex.ac.uk)


Read more about Citation Cartels & Citation Stacking here:

Create and Measure Impact

There are several ways of measuring impact, depending on what impact we are talking about.


Research Impact - changes and benefits that occur outside of the academy as a result of research. Case studies are often used to demonstrate this type of impact, and this is the impact that is referred to in the REF (Research Excellence Framework).

Academic Impact - advances in understanding, method, theory and application across and within disciplines. Academic Impact is measured by citations.


This section will only advise on Academic Impact, for Research Impact (especially regarding the REF) please have a look at the Impact and the REF section from the Research and Enterprise Office’s website (Essex users only).


Measuring Academic Impact

Bibliometrics is the term used when talking about measuring academic impact (citations). Various databases can be used to analyse citations, most of them subscription based (Google Scholar is free, but citations can be inaccurate – see more here).

The University of Essex subscribes to Scopus and SciVal, two tools that can help you get an overview of citations on various levels – from researchers to institutions and countries. If you want more guidance on how to use these tools, please get in touch (see below).


Ways to create and improve academic impact:

  • Improve keywords in your article before publishing.
  • Publish Open Access.
  • Choose the correct outlet for your research: Think about who you will reach by publishing in a specific journal.
  • Create an ORCID to collect your research in one place.
  • Create a Google Scholar profile.
  • Check your Scopus profile for potential mistakes, and link your ORCID to it.
  • Share your publications on Social Media (e.g. Twitter).
  • Write a post for The Conversation.
IMPACT

For more information and help with measuring and improving your academic impact please contact our Scholarly Communications and Research Support Manager – Katrine Sundsbo (ksunds@essex.ac.uk)

Online Research Profiles

Once you publish several profiles are created for you on various platforms. Most of these allow you to take ownership in one way, and it is important that you pay attention to you.

(Researcher Contributer ID)

ORCID (Researcher Contributer ID)

This is a universal identifier where researchers can add all their works, education and work experience into one place - almost like a CV! Having an ORCID is a requirement from the University of Essex as this identifier will be used in the next REF (Research Excellence Framework). It is also used in many funder applications.

Google Scholar Profile

Google Scholar Profile

Google Scholar is the largest database of scholarly literature. Creating a Google Scholar profile and linking it to the University of Essex is a requirement for all academics at the university.

Some caution in interpreting citations from Google Scholar is needed, as Google Scholar is known for adding more citations to works than there actually is. This is because it sometimes cannot tell the difference between an actual citation and e.g. a library index.

SCOPUS

SCOPUS

A Scopus ID is created for you once your work is indexed in Scopus. You will have limited interaction with the profile (e.g. you can request changes to your profile but they have to be reviewed by the Scopus team) though you are required to check your profile occasionally to make sure details and documents are correct. Scopus can provide you with information about your citations in addition to information about how many times your research has been mentioned in the news or on Twitter and more.

ResearcherID

ResearcherID

ResearcherID is linked to Web of Science, a database of peer reviewed literature, similar to Scopus. Unlike Scopus, a ResearcherID profile is not created for you; this is something you have to create yourself.



Social & Networking Platforms

Some social platforms have been created to increase networking and sharing between academics. Below are a few of the most popular ones.

Research Gate

Research Gate

This is a social networking platform for researchers. It is often used to share publications and connect with others. However, if you want to use ResearchGate to share publications you need to make sure you do not breach any copyright restrictions (e.g. uploading an article that is behind a paywall is illegal).

Academia.edu

Academia.edu

Academia.edu is also a social network platform for researchers. Though this platform is less interactive than ResearchGate it has many of the same functions and you can also upload your own work to this platform (though you need to consider copyright restrictions on this site as well).

Twitter

Twitter

Twitter is not created for academics but it can be a very useful platform for sharing research and increasing visibility. It can also be great for networking and finding new conferences or events, as long as you follow the right accounts!

Scholarly Hub

Scholarly Hub

This network has not yet been launched but it is a new initiative by scholars who are against platforms and companies that benefit financially from their work. This platform is non-profit and will involve a networking aspect as well as a publishing aspect. Something to watch!

To learn more about online profiles for researchers or to get help setting up or making changes to any of the accounts, get in touch with our Scholarly Communications & Research Support Manager Kat Sundsbo ksunds@essex.ac.uk

Early Career Researchers

Our aim is to support development of all researchers at the University of Essex. However, given the current climate of Higher Education we recognise that Early Career Researchers might require more support than established researchers.

Am I an Early Career Researcher?

Early Career Researchers are usually defined as final year PhD students, Post-docs and researchers in the early stages of their career (but can be anyone who identifies themselves as an early career researcher).



Support Offered

Newcomers

Twice a year (January and June) we are hosting the Newcomers Research Week where we offer a range of training sessions aimed at Early Career Researchers as well as the opportunity to network with research support staff across the university, senior researchers and other Early Career Researchers. We are also organising a range of events and training via Newcomers throughout the year.

Join our Newcomers mailing list to stay up to date with events and opportunites for researchers at the University of Essex. If you want to get in touch, please email newcomers@essex.ac.uk

Newcomers

Training sessions and workshops

Since November 2017 we have increased the number of training sessions offered to Early Career Researchers at the University of Essex. Current training sessions and events can be found at the Newcomers website under Upcoming Events.

During term we have drop-in workshops running in the Library on things like reference management software and finding the best journal to publish in.


See previous programme of workshops in the Library here.


One-to-one Advice

Research can differ a lot across disciplines, so we offer one-to-one sessions to make sure you get the best advice. To book a session please email the Scholarly Communications and Research Support Manager Katrine Sundsbo at ksunds@essex.ac.uk and give a brief summary of what you need help with.



Enquiries

Library
The University of Essex
Wivenhoe Park
Colchester
Essex
CO4 3UA
+44 (0) 1206 873192
libline@essex.ac.uk